Pet Shelters often start to fill up after the holidays when not so well thought out plans of giving pets for Christmas turn into family burdens. As advocates for responsible pet ownership and pet adoption vs purchasing we wanted to send a few reminders out as the shopping season kicks off. Don’t fall victim to the “picture-perfect” holiday – It’s tempting to want to create an ideal Christmas morning for your family. A puppy with a bow around its neck sets the perfect scene. Remember to think past the bow this year and focus on the practicality of helping your child care for a puppy/dog in the long term. Pets for Christmas always seem like a great idea until the New Year rolls around…
Pets are like humans – Humans aren’t the only creatures capable of forming bonds. When you take a pet into your home there is an emotional connection felt by the animal. Just because you’re ready to take your pet to the shelter after it’s peed on the rug for the 100th time, doesn’t mean it’s ready to be sent away. Have a family discussion about the responsibilities before you commit to any pets for Christmas!
Pets aren’t like humans – Unlike people you can’t explain a situation and expect them to understand. As the creature greater of a higher intellectual capacity, it is your responsibility to learn how to communicate and teach your pet. Don’t abandon them for your failings and don’t bring one home unless you’re willing to put forth this effort.
 
Look into rehoming before you go to the shelter – Circumstances change and sometimes through no fault of our own pets just can’t fit into our lives any longer. Before you take your pet down to the local shelter put forth some effort to rehome your pet yourself. Rehomeyourpets.com is a great website that allows you to connect with people in your area looking for a pet! This process is so much easier on your pet than going through a shelter. They leave one home for another and you get to meet the people who will be adopting your pet!
Don’t go to a pet shop for a purebred! – If your heart is set on a purebred or designer dog, don’t think that pet shops are the only places to find them. 25% of all dogs in shelters fall under this category.